Frank Armstrong

  • armstrong

    Posted in:

    Oceanic Consciousness

    We think of ourselves as unique, and so we are, but defining individuality is problematic. Ninety percent of a person’s cells – mostly bacteria – are not their own while those cells with our distinct genetic codes only last up to ten years. In terms of consciousness this poses questions such as: where is memory […]

    Read more

  • finian-mcgrath

    Posted in:

    Action (not Acts)!

    When a State enacts legislation that creates a right for a category of person, it is acknowledging that society has excluded or marginalised those people and is seeking to rectify this. This is why people with disabilities welcomed the Assisted Decision- Making Act 2015 last year. It is why, despite some misgivings, they welcomed the […]

    Read more

  • department_of_justice_equality_and_law_reform

    Posted in:

    Public sect or agent of equality

    What is it about Irish legislation? We set up this complicated institutional apparatus to enact it. We elect all sorts to devise and deliberate on it. Much of the time of civil society is diverted to lobbying for it. Legislation doesn’t come cheap or easy. However, while we are entitled to have some minimum expectations, […]

    Read more

  • rope

    Posted in:

    Not the rate, the loopholes

    For the current partnership Government and its political-allies-in-opposition the end of summer has brought with it some rather unpleasant affairs. And a string of seemingly never-ending, insider scandals rocking the Irish charitable and sports ‘sectors’, is just a small headache, compared to the migraines of Irish economic and tax-policy fiascos. The reason is simple: in […]

    Read more

  • Dear Mr Wallace and Ms Daly...

    Posted in:

    Namaleaks

    The NAMA story is the media gift that keeps on giving. Not a day passes but further damaging revelations emerge of the manner in which the agency charged with selling off the distressed and other assets arising from the State’s property collapse has behaved. Charged with disposing of commercial and residential properties on an enormous […]

    Read more

  • smith-apple

    Posted in:

    26% me arse thanks, Apple

    Irish politics insincerely enmires itself in the need for joined-up thinking, that ubiquitous cliché. But it skirts around the best place for it: amalgamating our erratic but once again soaring economic genius with other more real agendas – making sure we pursue ends and not just means, that we advance social, environmental, cultural and transparency […]

    Read more

  • aib-cover

    Posted in:

    The vanishing Devane

    Andrew ‘Andy’ Devane may not be familiar to you. However the buildings, mostly ergonomic and beautiful democratic public buildings in concrete, always imbued with his generosity and modern perfectionism, certainly will be. Early Years Andy Devane was born on 3 November 1917 in 1 Upper Hartstonge Street, in Georgian Limerick. He was the eldest of […]

    Read more

  • waters-foetus

    Posted in:

    Laws of unintended coherence

    What an irony it would be, in these times of the exponentially reducing quality of public debate arising from media degeneracy, parliamentary groupthink, the tyrannical imperatives of political correctness, the moronic cacophony of the twitterati and the impoverishment of the education system, if the only functional dialectic available to our society was to occur between […]

    Read more

  • Leadership favourites ahoy

    Posted in:

    No more broken pencils

    Simon Coveney was born in Minane Bridge, Cork in 1972. Scion of a family of Cork’s rarefied merchant bourgeoisie, Simon was one of six children of Pauline and Hugh Coveney. Both his parents were Mayors of Cork and his father, Hugh, Minister for Defence in 1994 before resigning the following year after he leaked details […]

    Read more

  • teetering

    Posted in:

    Teetering

    Walking around the complex of rocks, Doric columns and temples of the Acropolis in Athens evokes the debt Western Civilisation owes to the ancient Graeco- Roman world. It was here that the Athenian City State developed the first and most sophisticated philosophical notions of how a democracy should work. It remains remarkable how much of […]

    Read more

  • Scandinavian-looking, flat-roofed bungalow

    Posted in:

    Where optimism died

    Driving down the dreary N11 eight miles out of Dublin a curious grouping of houses peeks intermittently over a high County Councilissue boundary stone wall. It’s just another far-flung estate. But in 1963 this represented the modernist dream: open-plan clapboard-fronted American-style houses with two garages adjoining the convenient new tree-lined dual-carriageway, one of Ireland’s first. […]

    Read more

  • Mountains over Marrakech

    Posted in:

    Peak Tourist

    ‘Eight Million Tourists Expected To Visit Ireland Next Year As Star Wars Effect Lifts Off’ Headline in the Irish Examiner, December 1, 2015 Marrakech is a hard city to leave, because someone is always tugging at your arm. One hour south, near the highest mountain in North Africa, you can hike to a pass with […]

    Read more

  • Bremain

    Posted in:

    Bremain

    Brexit will probably never happen. The news narrative has become one of delay, with the odd Brexiteer keeping the flag flying in the Daily Telegraph but a lot of stasis. Next year, there will be many stories about the major problems that Brexit will cause. Negative economic effects will loom. Village editorialised in its last […]

    Read more

  • foxe-care

    Posted in:

    Unexplained disparities in care orders

    Children are more than twice as likely to end up in care in one region of the country as they are in another, official figures from the child and family agency Tusla have shown. The records show that the number of children ending up subject to care orders is significantly above the national average in […]

    Read more

  • Trump-sculpture

    Posted in:

    The Emperor has no balls

    Depressing as the US election may be for progressives at least it’s spawning some spirited political art from which the rest of us can learn. For example ‘Indecline’ went viral when it erected guerrilla statues overnight of a naked Donald Trump, in several US cities. Each bore the title, ‘The Emperor has no Balls’. Though […]

    Read more

  • Corbyn

    Posted in:

    Corbin in the light

    Trolls, bullies, and wounded egos stalk Twitter and Facebook. Blocks are interposed. Friends are defriended. The internet is the forum of choice in the most recent Battle of Britain that is Jeremy Corbyn. The mainstream media has joined the battle rather than offer any analysis. Cool perspectives are not available. ‘Corbyn: The Strange Birth of […]

    Read more

  • Deep, rich and homegrown

    Posted in:

    The local

    General disparagement that anyone concerned with their own patch must be a small-minded xenophobe fuelled the Brexit debate. Such lazy stereotyping of Leave voters by the liberal collective undermines its own self-perception as open-minded. In the midst of this continuing existential maelstrom, my metaphysical GPS has been happily trekking a terrain of books based on […]

    Read more

  • Foster

    Posted in:

    Nice

    Newish Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster is in the middle of a successful charm offensive. She is popular, even with some Nationalists. The vortex into normality engulfs ever more of the increasingly hateless political classes despite themselves. We have recently emerged from one of the quietest marching seasons since the Troubles began. Any friction […]

    Read more

  • 000ca5a5-1600

    Posted in:

    Pat Hickey as Moses

    Reading a Pulitzer-winning New York biography over the summer it was difficult not to think of Pat Hickey and his control of the Olympic Council of Ireland (OCI). Hickey’s ego and ability to run rings around ministers is reminiscent, on a much smaller scale, of the way Robert Moses domineered in New York from the […]

    Read more

  • Fragile

    Posted in:

    Fragile

    Shane Ross knows a thing or two about US multi-national corporations and the way they operate in this globalised economy. They avoid tax, in particular the 35% rate that applies in the US. No amount of huffing and puffing by Tim Cook, Michael Noonan or anyone else can alter that fact, and Ross knows it. […]

    Read more