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    (S)height

    Eoghan Murphy’s crude and desperate guidelines on Building Heights risk the aesthetic of our towns and cities By Michael Smith   Density is desirable We should all be able to agree the desirability of densification of the Dublin City area – in accordance with the principles of sustainable development. The advantages of density include being […]

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    Dáil and its legal reform is pro-lawyer

    The circumstances of the demise of former Minister for Justice, Alan Shatter, diverted attention from the risk of the thwarting of his reforms of the legal profession. Infamously many ministers, and their – often informal – advisers, are lawyers. Indicative of the problem is that at the last reading of the proposed reform bill, it […]

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    Profile: Treasury Holdings and Johnny Ronan

    The Treasury boys are back.  Without Treasury. Great.  Richard Barrett is reported to be deploying two billion euro of investment in property and Johnny Ronan has paid Nama back and is back in business all  over town.  He’s even found time to make reference to Nazi slogans in pinpointing the injustice done to him by […]

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    Barristers’ Code allows them to act despite conflicts of interest.

    By Michael Smith. I remember 25 years ago attending a lecture on ethics for barristers in the King’s Inns (motto Nolumus Mutari 1541 – ‘we don’t want to be changed 1541’). An eminent (though aren’t they all?) senior counsel and ‘bencher’ (don’t ask!) was batting for the Bar Council. A student asked why a second-level teacher […]

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    Why no prosecutions?

        Why no prosecutions? Some unethical behaviour is not criminal; and some prosecuting authorities are slow or inert. So bankers and the villains of our tribunals are not getting justice.   By Michael Smith   The law on corruption • The main relevant law in place when the activities considered by the tribunals took […]

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